Bolt Action M3 Lee medium tank

This is a M3 review double feature, as I'll show you today the M3 Lee and the M3 Grant (with track guards). The M3 Lee kit is a regular shelf product, that comes in a boxed set. Warlord offers the Grant as a made-to-order / direct order product.

Bolt Action - M3 Lee Bolt Action - M3 Lee

The M3 medium tank (not to be confused with the M3 Stuart / M3A1), was an American medium tank, that was supplied to other allied forces, like the British, Australian or Soviets during World War II. The differentiation between Lee and Grant, was done by the turret. The American issued turret (like in this kit) was called Lee, after the Confederate General Lee, the British issued turret after the Union General Grant.


Bolt Action M3 Grant medium tank with track guard

In addition to the M3 Lee review, this article will cover the british Grant variant of the M3 with track guards.

Bolt Action - M3 Grant with track guards

Unlike the M3 Lee, this kit is only available as made-to-order and therefore comes without a box in a simple bubble wrap bag.

As the M3 is already introduced in the other article, I'll focus here on the M3 Grant. Of the more than 6,000 Units the Americans build of the M3 Lee, 2,855 units were handed over to the British, who supplied them within the Commonwealth. The British had added modifications to their order, a different turret was designed with thicker armor plate, more space to house radio equipment and the machine gun cupola to be replaced with a simple hatch. The later was even done to some of the M3 Lee turrets in use by the British in China, Burma and India. And some of the M3 that were to be deployed in North Africa received sand guards, as this kit has as well.


Bolt Action Campaign New Guinea

After Empire in Flames, Bolt Action revisites the far east with the supplement Campaign New Guinea.

Bolt Action - Campaign New Guinea Bolt Action - Campaign New Guinea

With 132 pages, Campaign New Guinea set a short new high score for page load, trumping Battle of the Bulge and Duel in the Sun (both 124 pages), only second to the recently released The Road to Berlin (148 pages). This campaign supplement covers the part of the pacific wars on the planets second largest island, between the Japanese Empire and the Allied Forces (Australian and US American). The price tag on this book reads 19,99 GBP or 30 USD, which translates roughly into 25 EUR. I want to start this review with the comparison of the the final cover (left) and the early cover (right), presented by Osprey in one of their product catalogues. Nothing unusual, we already saw different covers circulating early among others for Duel in the Sun as well.


Bolt Action Universal Carrier Wasp Mk II

Along with the previous introduced Chindits, there is need for suiting vehicular support. In Burma they used the nimble bren carriers to transport soldiers and goods, some of the universal carriers were fitted with a flamethrower and called Wasp, which I want to introduce in this review.

Bolt Action - British Wasp Flamethrower Carrier

Of the more than 110,000 units that were build of the universal carrier, roughly 1,000 units were manufactured as the wasp. The wasp carried the Ronson flamethrower system, with the Mark I having it fixed in the front and the Mk II the projector on the co-driver's position. Both had two fuel tanks with a capacity of 100 gallons. The canadians developed the Mk IIC with a single 75 gallon fuel tank. As you can see from the product image, this is the Mark II of the wasp.


An army with an exotic theme – Chindits for Bolt Action

I have this lot of chindits lying around for quite some time now, and I want to explain why I chose these and what is the motivation behind it.

First of all, why a themed army? I always liked from background to my projects, wether it is sourced ficitional or historical. I like to have a proper base to start from. A source to begin with, a common thread that combines the miniatures. And it doesn't matter, if it is sci-fi, fantasy or historical. Simply painting your marines blue like on the box, is less interesting to me, than to read the books and see for something that catches my eye. I have to go back in my arguments, back when I started wargaming, I played Warhammer Fantasy and 40k, like many others do or used to do. A regular army project was already an invest and a themed army would easily be something that would drive up the costs by at least 50%, as you had to gather specific bits and pieces for conversions etc. But historical wargaming is usually much cheaper, as there are more companies offering the same ranges.  Exotic or themed armies can still be difficult or more costly, as in some cases only one or a few companies are covering specific nations or conflicts.

In this case, as we're talking Bolt Action, we're talking World War II. The conflict is rather Euro-centric and most go for the elite or well known armies, US Airborne, Afrikakorps or something similar. You have battles between Americans, British or Russians on one side and Germans on the other. There is often not that much variation, as you more or less see the same armies. As with the armies I already have, different German forces, US American and British late war western front forces, those have broad vehicle pools, only a few limitations. So I looked for something far from home. I could have gone with the blue division (spanish volunteers on the eastern front), but that is more or less a regular german army with a minor different paint job. Along the campaign supplements for Bolt Action "Empire in Flames" was a very interesting read for me, as it showed that there many conflicts that lead to a global war scenario, beside the tension after World War 1, but I don't want to go into detail on that, I'll pick up the conflict in the pacific in the upcoming review on the Campaign: New Guinea. More interesting was for me this specific special army of the British in Burma. Warlord has these in their Bolt Action range and they were sculpted by the talented hands of Paul Hicks, so the miniatures had it easy to "lure" me in.

As the chindit range is entirely metal, it is spread across a couple of blister codes and a single larger box, with lots of different poses. I went more or less with ordering one of everything, as you can see below. And as we're talking Bolt Action, around 1,000 pts should be enough and not to costly.

Bolt Action - Chindits


Infamous JT Warsaw Uprising Kubus

The "crown jewel" of the currently running Warsaw Uprising Kickstarter campaign by Infamous JT is most certainly the Kubus, that I want to show you in this pre-release review.

Infamous JT - Warsaw Uprising Kubus

The Warsaw Uprising is part of the late war years of the second world war. It was an operation of the polish Home Army (Armia Krajowa) to liberate Warsaw from the German occupation. There were resistance cells in many occupied countries, in some cases the Allies supported the resistance with equipment and gear, in other cases the underground look after themselfes. In this case, the polish resistance built an armoured car in secret, based on a Chevrolet 157 truck and called it "Little Jakob" (Kubuś). It was one of a kind and often seen with a captured Sd.Kfz.251/3 Ausf.D named Grey Wolf.


Undead Blood Bowl Team – Golden Vultures

Almost eight years ago, I started a Blood Bowl project in a german-speaking forum, with the aim to create a team by simply using leftovers that I found in my bitzbox. In doing so, I wanted to make sure that I painted and played as well, and that's how the concept of "Challenge" came into being, where I had to completely paint up a mini before each game.

As I rummaged in my Bitzbox, I noticed that there were still a surprisingly large number of remnants of a classic human plastic team and skeletons lying around. At that time available Undead Blood Bowl players were all made of pewter and since you touch your models often in this game, I wanted to avoid this material as much as possible. So the thought grew in me to combine the remains of the old human team with those of the skeletons.

Blood Bowl - Undead Team Golden Vultures


Blood Bowl – Skycastle Titans Part 2

A guest article by Daniel / DinoTitanEdition on his Blood Bowl Underworld Team, the Skycastle Titans.

"Oye ... what is dat?"
"Dunno coach, da troll wanted to eat da little gobbo there and did`t let go."
"Da git is quite big .... O.K. Place our most delicious player near the middleline. We gon’ keepz da troll. "

At the Skycastle Titans' last team presentation (read it HERE), you've probably noticed that some of the team’s players have been missing yet. It`s about time for an update.

In order to maintain motivation when painting a team, it usually makes sense to start with the rather expendable players to reward yourself with the more interesting models. Accordingly, I painted the linerat as the first of the last four psychos…er…players. I chose a helmeted head from a few regiment lefovers of the Skaven and gave the rat an additional shoulder padding, which rounded off the Blood Bowl look nicely.

The troll, on the other hand, was one of the more elaborate conversions - for many years this classic model was languishing in a box, half painted but never finished. Partly out of pity, partly out of a strange fascination to overhaul old models, I stripped it from color and stuck all sorts of plastic parts to it. Retrospectively it occurred to me that he looked a bit like Flavor Flav, a well-known rapper from the 80s.

Blood Bowl - Skycastle Titans


Citadel Painting Handle

End of the year is always time for terrain and hobby supplies at Games Workshop, so around Christmas we got a new painting handle by Citadel.

Games Workshop - Citadel Painting Handle Games Workshop - Citadel Painting Handle


Iron giants, iron calves and hovering boats

I saw this picture on facebook, it is a K2SO toy converted by Steve Perry (Rubicon Models UK represenatitv) into a 28mm terrain piece. That would be awesome for all kinds of Sci-Fi settings, from the Ashwastes of Necromunda, over Gates of Antares to Rogue Stars.

Star Wars - K2SO Ruins