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15Aug/180

The Legend of Dead Man’s Hand

The original version of The Dead Man's Hand was written by Great Escape Games (2013) and was later expanded by the french Studio Tomahawk with additional, optional rules. The present review is the German version of the Dead Man's Hand rules, which is distributed in Germany by Stronghold Terrain. Previous rule enhancements are included in the 94-page book and once again arranged to complement rules and characters.

Dead Man's Hand The Legend of Dead Man's Hand

What is it about?
Dead Man's Hand puts great importance in capturing the atmosphere of the 1960s and '70s spaghetti western movies. In several mini-campaigns or in free scenarios, ten different gangs compete in skirmish struggles.
The story of the fictional Wild West town of Dead Man's Hand begins in 1853 Arizona and continues sporadic chunks of story until about 1870. How the city got its name remains uncertain over the path of the book, although there are some legends about it. Hence the name of the game.

5Aug/180

Converting Winter Germans

I've covered the review on the German infantry in winter gear a couple of days ago and already opened up on the possibilities to convert them, by adding parts from other sprues and kits. Due to the way the miniatures in the Warlord Games kits are cut, it is quite easy to use parts from other sets within the range. With the Winter Germans two of the most interesting kits to swap parts with are the Soviet Infantry Winter and German Grenadiers.

Before the Winter Germans were released in April, a couple of people used the bodies from the Winter Soviets and added German weaponry and heads. That is quite easy to do, as the Soviet kit is from the older design pattern, where you had open hands and separate weapons. The cloaks have a different design to the German ones, but with some backpacks and the weaponry in front of them, you barely notice or it is repurposed clothing. That works at least for Ostfront armies.

Converting Bolt Action Winter Germans Converting Bolt Action Winter Germans Converting Bolt Action Winter Germans

26Jul/180

Bolt Action German Infantry (Winter)

After starting the themed week with the supplement The Road to Berlin itself, and covering several tanks as well, it is time to review the matching infantry kit of the Germans in winter gear. Last year, along with the The Battle of the Bulge, Warlord Games supplied the Germans with an extensive range of winter troops made from metal. Around the end of April, for the Salute, a new plastic kit for the "Winter Germans" was introduced, to cover the fights on both, Western and Eastern front during the winter.

Bolt Action - German Infantry (Winter) Bolt Action - German Infantry (Winter)

This box contains 30 miniatures in 28mm scale made from hard plastic. The price is set at 26 GBP. As you can see from the classification on the cover, these can be used for early, mid and late war settings.

Bolt Action - German Infantry (Winter)

23Jul/180

Bolt Action King Tiger with Zimmerit plastic kit

The King Tiger is in a couple of variants available at Warlord Games, with the plastic kit in cooperation with Italeri being the youngest incarnation of the German heavy battle tank.

Bolt Action - King Tiger with Zimmerit Bolt Action - King Tiger with Zimmerit

The King Tiger, or sometimes called Royal Tiger, has the internal designation of Sd.Kfz. 182 or Panzerkampfwagen VI Ausf. B Tiger II. Ausführung B and Tiger II showing it as a derivate of the Tiger I tank, but improved with sloped armour that made more use of the thick armour plates of the Tiger tanks. After initial problems with the reliability, it proved to be a remarkable battle tank towards the very last month of the war. The Tiger II was the pinnacle of the heavy tank series that actually got into production, unlike the Panzer VII Löwe or Panzer VIII Maus that never really left the drawing board (or in case of the Maus just had some mock-ups or prototypes).

22Jul/180

Bolt Action IS-2 Heavy Tank

The heaviest plastic tank kit Warlord Games offers for the soviet forces is the IS-2 heavy tank - a perfect match for the Bolt Action campaign supplement The Road to Berlin and worthy enemy for the King Tiger. Time to honour it with a review on its own.

Bolt Action - IS-2 Heavy Tank Bolt Action - IS-2 Heavy Tank

The IS-2 (Iosef Stalin, in Wnglisch often called JS-2 for Joseph Stalin) was the successor of the IS series heavy tank and counts as one of the most powerful tanks of World War 2. It was developed to withstand the German 8,8 cm guns and to counter Tiger and Panther tanks with the 122mm gun. It went into service in April 1944 and was used in the final offensive of the Red Army towards Berlin. Of the IS-2 were 3.850 units built between 1943 and 45, making it the most numerous tank of the IS series and triple the number of produced Tiger I. Besides being field by the Red Army / soviet forces, the IS-2 was part of the Polish and Czechoslovakian tank forces towards the end of the war. To the end of the war, the IS-3 was introduced as a derivative of the IS-2. IS-2s often would carry soviet soldiers into battle, offering valuable protection from enemy infantry. Warlord pays respect to this and adds a sprue of plastic infantry to this kit.

21Jul/180

Bolt Action King Tiger with Henschel Turret

Another iconic tank from the late war period is the PzKpfw VI Tiger II, in this review we're looking at the resin kit by Warlord Games picturing the Ausf. B without Zimmerit and a Henschel turret.

Bolt Action - King Tiger with Henschel turret Bolt Action - King Tiger with Henschel turret

The Tiger II, also known as King Tiger or Royal Tiger, was the derivate of the Tiger I, and combined the thick armour of the predecessor and the sloped armour of the Panther medium tank. The pattern was the pinnacle of German tank development and production, and after initial problems with reliability it proved to be a remarkable battle tank. The Tiger II first saw service in summer of 1944, at the Invasion of Normandy by the Allies, and was issued to the Wehrmacht as well as to the Waffen-SS heavy tank battalions. A total number of just below 500 units was produced until March '45, of these the first 50 were issued with the Porsche turret due to bottlenecks in production of the Henschel turret. In the first months of the productions, both variants of the Tiger (I and II) were build simultaneously.

20Jul/180

Bolt Action Campaign The Road to Berlin

With the Ostfront supplement for Bolt Action, the campaign covered the "entire" activities that involved the Russian armies, beginning with the Winter war and Khalkin Gol. But this new supplement, Campaign The Road to Berlin, covers the very last years, from June 1944 until the crossing of the Spree.

Bolt Action - Campaign The Road to Berlin Bolt Action - Campaign The Road to Berlin

Warlord Games goes into the detail on these years of the late war. Very much into detail indeed, with 148 pages this campaign supplement is the biggest so far. Campaign New Guinea is a couple of pages short with 132 pages, followed by Battle of the Bulge and Duel in the Sun both with 124 pages. So you get quite the bang for your 19.99 GBP or 30 USD. Shown above as first images of this review are the two covers, with the final cover (left) and the early cover (right), presented by Osprey in one of their product catalogues. This happens quite often, to promote an upcoming book, before the final decision on the artwork is done. We have already seen this with Duel in the Sun and Campaign New Guinea.

2Jul/180

Bolt Action Jagdpanzer 38(t), Flammpanzer 38(t) and 2cm Flak auf Hetzer

To finish on 38(t) week, I cover today the Hetzer kit by Warlord Games. As this kit covers quite the broad variants, I'll base the review around the Hetzer Zug kit, so I can build all three variants; the Hetzer, the Flammpanzer and 2cm FlaK 38 Hetzer reconnaissance anti-aircraft vehicle.

Bolt Action - Jagdpanzer 38(t) Hetzer Bolt Action - Jagdpanzer 38(t) Hetzer

1Jul/180

Rubicon Models Jagdpanzer 38(t) Hetzer

You can't talk about the 38(t) series without mentioning the Jagdpanzer 38(t) Hetzer, and that is why today I cover the kit by Rubicon Models in this review.

Rubicon Models - Jagdpanzer 38(t) Hetzer Rubicon Models - Jagdpanzer 38(t) Hetzer

As the tank destroyers Marder based upon the Panzer 38(t) were more of an industrialized "field conversion" using captured anti-tank guns and later regular PaKs, a properly designed light tank destroyer was needed. Introduced as the Sd.Kfz. 138/2 Jagdpanzer 38(t), this tank was produced from April 1944 until the end of the war, along the heavier Jagdpanther and Jagdtiger variants. The name "Hetzer" is undocumented and it is unclear, were it actually came from and it is highly discussed if the tank even was called that during the war. Hetzer comes from the German verb "hetzen", meaning hounding or rushing somebody or something.

28Jun/180

Bolt Action Sd.Kfz. 139 Marder III

Continuing the Panzer 38(t) themed review week, with the Marder III Ausf. H tank destroyer based on the Panzer 38(t) chassis.

Bolt Action - SdKfz 139 Marder III Bolt Action - SdKfz 139 Marder III

Based upon the chassis of the Sd.Kfz. 140 Panzer 38(t), a tank destroyer called Marder III was brought into service. The whole Marder series were makeshift tank destroyers, an interim solution, to put captured or obsolete vehicles in to use, by arming them at first with captured field guns and later with German PaK anti-tank guns. The Marder I was built upon the French Lorraine tank and the Marder II on the surplus of rapidly becoming obsolete Panzer II tanks. Marder is German for marten. The Marder III was built in three variants, as Sd.Kfz. 139, Sd.Kfz. 138 Ausf. H and Ausf. M.