chaosbunker.de
19Aug/190

Korea, Tanks and even more Boats

I am currently preparing the Cruel Seas review, along with the Flotillas and larger ships. I mentioned the resin ships in my last short update, Civilans, Romans and Boats, and I find it very appealing to build something completely different to the very dominant 28mm kits that I usually cover.

Warlord Games - Cruel Seas Warlord Games - Cruel Seas

Assembly goes fast, as does the cleaning of the models, but the instructions could be clearer. I'll go into detail on that in the review.

13Aug/190

Lords of WarCry – Da Redfists, Part 1

The WarCry hypetrain is in full throttle in the vastness of the internet and we also heard the call to arms in the Chaosbunker. Personally I'm going to work on parts of an old project and continue with it, because I have a lot of unpainted minis lying around at home for Age of Sigmar, but I didn't play anymore after the release of the second edition. Participating in a group project is a good opportunity to reduce the pile of shame a little bitand still have fun.

Respect da Redfists

12Aug/190

Warhammer Age of Sigmar – Sigmarite Dais

Terrain is an important part of any game, and I am always keen to see, what interesting pieces can be added to a gamers collection. The Dominion of Sigmar was introduced earlier this year, as fantasy counterpart to the very well done Sectors already available for Warhammer 40,000. Among those temples and shrines in the name of Sigmar is a round plateau, the Sigmarite Dais, which we are going to take a closer look upon today.

Warhammer Age of Sigmar - Dominion of Sigmar Sigmarite Dais Warhammer Age of Sigmar - Dominion of Sigmar Sigmarite Dais

This kit belongs to the Dominion of Sigmar, that covers multiple sets of a similar theme, among them a larger set, the Enduring Stormvault, and an "entry level" piece, the Shattered Temple. Along with the Ravaged Lands for Warcry, we see the Shattered Stormvault as well, a terrain set, that will hopefully be covered in a couple of days here as well.

4Aug/190

Warhammer Age of Sigmar WarCry – Part 2

As promised we continue the review on Warcry today, after we've talked about the Warbands and other miniatures yesterday, the second part will focus on the terrain and gaming board you will fight your matches on.

Included with Warcry as part of the terrain is a 22" by 30" folding game plan. It is printed on both sides, but more on that further below. At first I was a bit irritated, as it is rather large, but it just folds one time less than the Kill Zone boards, as you can see in the comparison picture.

Warhammer Age of Sigmar WarCry Warhammer Age of Sigmar WarCry Warhammer Age of Sigmar WarCry

Warcry picks up on the folding game boards, that were introduced with Kill Team. If you remember the "buzz" on the size of them when they were released, that they were not orientating on the 4' by 4' or 4' by 6', but 22" by 30". Why is that? Well, that is size that is more appliable in gaming stores, taking up less space and making it possible for more participants to play on the same or smaller amount of tables. It roughly orientates on the dimensions of trading card games while using mats and such.

3Aug/190

Warhammer Age of Sigmar Warcry – Part 1

Today is the release day of the newest boxed set within the Warhammer Age of Sigmar Universe - Warcry! Warcry is a skirmish game with smaller warbands and is offered as a starter set including terrain and gaming board, similar to what we know from Warhammer 40,000 Kill Team.

Warhammer Age of Sigmar WarCry Warhammer Age of Sigmar WarCry Warhammer Age of Sigmar WarCry

The box the starter set comes in is one huge beast, as you can see above and weights around 9 lb / 4 kg. It is quite thick and stable, similar to the Speed Freeks boxed set. It is twice as high as the regular Warhammer Age of Sigmar starter kits as you can see in the picture below. If you have ordered your copy in a Warhammer store or local gaming store, you might be in for treat, as they have several different promotional items, like these buttons and wristbands (as long as stock lasts).

25Jul/190

Adeptus Titanicus – Imperial and Cerastus Knights

In addition to the actual titans of Adeptus Titanicus, I got myself some of the smaller units, the Knights, as support.

Adeptus Titanicus - Imperial and Cerastus Knights

Knights are smaller and less powerful versions of Imperial Titans, piloted by a single Knight commander, called scion, and not by a crew of princeps and moderati. With the knights being much smaller than Warhound Scout Titans, they can only to a limited amount carry titan weapon systems into battle. The Knights were introduced to Epic / Space Marine in UK White Dwarf #126 in June 1990, and a few years later in December of 1994 updated as part of the new editions of this game, Epic Titan Legions. Some of the new classes even derivate from the old names and types. There were Paladins, Lancers and Wardens, and those came back in the current variant as well. In addition knights had tiers, Squire, Knight and Lord, along with Senechal. Something that was picked up in the latest rules for Warhammer 40,000 to a degree.

20Jul/190

Warhammer Age of Sigmar – Awakened Wyldwood

Along with some novelties for the Sylvaneth, primarely the Battletome, they receive a boxed set of terrain - the Awakened Wyldwood.

Warhammer Age of Sigmar - Awakened Wyldwood Warhammer Age of Sigmar - Awakened Wyldwood Warhammer Age of Sigmar - Awakened Wyldwood

15Jul/190

About painting…

Back then, in a grim and dark past, there was no such thing as washes on the market, and their counterparts, classic inks, were not as widespread as they are today. In the coming articles I will talk a little about the painting of figures in general and my personal preferences and experiences. A good start is my basic attitude towards this part of the hobby, or better yet, how it has changed over time. This will become clearer in the course of the further articles.

I returned to the hobby in 2001 when an old friend of mine met me in my american football club and I happened to see his models when we hung out one day. Since I was active in the hobby for a short time in my youth, it didn't seem strange to me and I thought, "Oh, that looks cool, but...what is it?". Because, the first time, I had seen the miniature hobby in a shop of the chain Welt der Spiele (Games Workshop stores didn't exist like sand at the sea at that time) and didn't know a single game system. Primarily the optical attraction had pulled me into the shop. The models covered the usual range from Fantasy to SciFi of different manufacturers.

In any case, over time I had had the desire to reach a level of painting that would approach a competition level. The internet was still in its childhood stages, but became a more and more important part of the hobby and in 2007 I had seen so many great models that were brought to life by their paintwork that I wanted the same.

Age of Sigmar - Orc Boss on Boar

10Jul/191

Citadel Colour Contrast – Part 2

So after the overview of the history of Citadel Colours, let's get painting and see how these work.

Games Workshop - Citadel Colour

8Jul/190

Citadel Colour Contrast – Part 1

Games Workshop introduced with their Contrast Colours a new part of their already quite broad painting range. But where does it come from and what does it do?
Games Workshop - Citadel Colour
Among the early days of Games Workshop, when they shifted from being a distributor and publisher towards the miniature tabletop company we know today, Citadel Miniatures played an important part in this. And they did not only supply the assortment with miniatures, but paints and brushes too. Of course, back in the day we were far away from the broad range of glazes, technicals and such, but even those first paints made similar to the miniatures a bold first impression.